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Label:
Name: TWILIGHT TIME
Number: TWILIGHT280-BR

THE BRIDGE AT REMAGEN (1969) (BLU-RAY)
Starring:  Ben Gazzara, E.G. Marshall, George Segal, Bradford Dillman, Robert Vaughn, Peter Van Eyck, Hans Christian Blech
Directed By:  John Guillermin
Composed By:  Elmer Bernstein

“The taking of a bridge provides the basis for an actionful World War II melodrama…Against this background chief interest rests in the performance of George Segal, a hard-boiled American platoon leader.”
– Variety

“Bristles with excitement…tense, properly chaotic and colorful. Mr.Guillermin, and his excellent photographer, have whipped up some fine, frenzied warfare on the bridge.”
– Howard Thompson, The New York Times

The Bridge at Remagen (1969) stars George Segal, Ben Gazzara, and Robert Vaughn in this tale of a desperate battle in the waning days of World War II. Segal is a war-weary combat team leader charged with taking a bridge over the Rhine during the Allies’ final push into Germany; Vaughn is his German opposite number, who’d rather blow up the bridge than have the Americans capture it. John Guillermin (The Towering Inferno) directs; the film was shot by the masterful veteran Stanley Cortez and features a score by the one and only Elmer Bernstein.

LANGUAGE: English
VIDEO: 1080p High Definition / 2.35:1
AUDIO: English 1.0 DTS-HD MA
SUBTITLES: English SDH
1969 / Color
117 MINUTES
RATED R Some War Violence and Brief Nudity

Special Features: Isolated Music Track / Original Theatrical Trailer

Limited Editions of 3,000 Units

  
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Posted by Mark Turner on July 28, 2017 2:58 PM
WAR IS HELL

It’s interesting to look back and see the development of war films over the decades since movies began being made. Early films showed us acts of heroism or were used as propaganda to promote war interests and boost the morale of people at home. In the fifties and sixties the war film began to slightly alter. There were plenty of movies still being made but stories focused on the homecoming of soldiers as well as events that happened. Even those movies began to alter as the war in Vietnam raged and suddenly the clean uniformed scenes of battle opened up to more gritty glimpses into what took place. The seventies led us into a look at war at its ugliest and also at the effects it imposed on those who fight. That was the standard until the last decade or so when we’ve seen a melding of all of these types of films, a good thing in my opinion, because the truth is indeed an amalgamation of all these points of view. But one of the first films in the sixties to begin that melding was THE BRIDGE AT REMAGEN.

Based on the true story of that bridge the film takes place during WWII. The German Army has been all but defeated and most of those in charge realize this. As they army retreats bridges are being blown up all along the river ways to prevent the invasion of Germany by the allied forces. The only bridge remaining is that in Remagen.

The film is told from both sides of the story. On the allied side leaders send their men in without care for their morale or the fatigue they feel. This is a chance to cut off nearly 10,000 German soldiers from their homeland and capture them. Tired, worn down and promised over and over again that they’ll get a break, a group led by Lt. Phil Hartman (George Segal), a battle weary but well informed leader, is pushed first to retake a town and then push even further on to take the bridge by Maj. Barnes (Bradford Dillman), a career officer who sees little of the battle from behind his command post while ordering others to move forward. Among the group under Hartman’s command is Sgt. “Angel” Angelo (Ben Gazzara), a soldier looking to do well financially from the war by collecting items from the dead German soldiers he comes across. This doesn’t sit well with Hartman and the two come into conflict from time to time.

On the other side we are presented with Maj. Paul Kreuger (Robert Vaughan). Kreuger is just back after a serious injury and given the job of blowing up the bridge at Remagen. Both he and Gen. Von Brock (Peter Van Eyck) disagree with the commands they receive from headquarters, more concerned with trying a last ditch effort to rescue the soldiers still on the other side of the Rhine river. But the high command doesn’t care, mistakenly feeling they can lose those soldiers and still win the war. Kreuger puts the charges in place to blow the bridge but holds off until the last minute before doing so.

These two stories move along at a steady pace with tons of battle sequences to press them forward. The intersecting of the two tales is what fills the final third of the film. What makes this movie different from most is that early war films had groups of men together fighting a common enemy and few were killed in the line of duty. This film shows that this wasn’t the case in reality. Men die. The body count climbs as commanders at a safe distance, on both sides, send out commands to their men to win at all costs. And those costs are the bodies of those same men.

The film is a solid war film and much better than I remember it having seen it as a child when it was first released. Both Segal and Vaughan present characters on both sides of the issue that have honor in their blood but are forced to follow orders. The supporting casts does an equally impressive job, bringing to life characters that you care about. John Guillermin’s direction is some of his best in a career that included THE BLUE MAX and THE TOWERING INFERNO.
Once more Twilight Time offers the cleanest and best looking copy of this film that can be found. Extras this time around are light and include the isolated music track and original theatrical trailer. As always the number of copies they are offering are limited so if you are at all interested make sure you pick one up before they’re gone.

Posted by Eric Finkelstein on July 29, 2017 11:17 PM
I think that "The Bridge At Remagen" was one of the greatest classic war films of all-time and is also one of my favorite classic war films of all-time. I have seen and enjoyed this film several times and I also think that "The Bridge At Remagen" had a lot of entertaining, exciting and enjoyable mystery, action and suspense including an exciting and amazing storyline as well.

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